Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018

Solo en Inglès

“The hope was for me as an artist to lose control, and to have my control exist at the level of setting up the experiment.” —Ian Cheng

Hear directly from artists and curators on selected works from Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018.

Installation view of Programmed.

Christiane Paul: I'm Christiane Paul, the Adjunct Curator of Digital Art at the Whitney Museum.

Programmed, essentially, addresses two notions of the program. One more in terms of code and algorithms, the way we would understand it as programmed in digital terms. The other idea of the program behind the show is that of the television program, and it's equipment, and signal, and also the manipulation of image sequences.

What is important about Programmed is that all of the works in the exhibition actually address the idea that they are programmed and based on instructions and rules. We typically understand programmed as a digital phenomenon these days, but what we want to make clear here is that there is a long history of instruction and rule-based art that is programmed.


Installation view of Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965-2018 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 28, 2018-April 14, 2019). From left to right: Nam June Paik, Fin de Siècle II, 1989 (partially restored, 2018); Sol LeWitt, Five Towers, 1986; Josef Albers, Homage to the Square V, 1967; Josef Albers, Homage to the Square IX, 1967; Josef Albers, Homage to the Square XII, 1967; Josef Albers, Homage to the Square X, 1967; Josef Albers, Variant V, 1966; Josef Albers, Variant VI, 1966; Josef Albers, Variant X, 1966; Josef Albers, Variant IV, 1966; Josef Albers, Variant II, 1966; Josef Albers, Variant VII, 1966; John F. Simon Jr., Color Panel v1.0, 1999; Rafaël Rozendaal, Abstract Browsing 17 03 05 (Google), 2017. Photograph by Ron Amstutz